Home | Order | About us | Contact us                                                                                                       
Modern Greek Culture
The Greek Church
Greek Folklore
The Year in Greece 2012
Early Travellers to Greece
A History of Athens
Greece Links

Untitled Document

A Greek Wedding

A Greek wedding in the Orthodox Church is as ceremonious as a Greek baptism, and followed by even more eating, drinking and dancing.

Marriages in Greece usually take place on a Saturday or Sunday evening. There are a number of days when it is forbidden to get married, including the fasting period of lent, forty days prior to Easter, that of Advent, forty days prior to Christmas, and the first fifteen days of August before Panayia (August 15th). It is also usually considered that marriage in a Leap Year is unlucky.

The couple to be married do not see one another on the day. The groom arrives before the bride, and the two families sit on opposite sides of the church. The bride arrives with her father, or a male relative, while the groom travels to the church with his best man.

The couple to be married do not see one another on the day. The groom arrives before the bride, and the two families sit on opposite sides of the church. The bride arrives with her father, or a male relative, while the groom travels to the church with his best man.

The central part of the betrothal service is the blessing and exchange of rings in token of the free consent of both parties to the union, after which bride and groom hold lighted candles. The most visible ceremony of the marriage service proper is the crowning of the bride and groom with wreaths, symbolically linked by a silken ribbon. At the end of this ceremony, the bride and groom drink wine from a single cup, symbolizing their future common life together.

During the service the bride and groom kiss the Bible and walk around the ceremonial table three times in what is called the 'dance of Isaiah', while the guests throw rice over them.

The party which follows is usually a large one, which in former centuries may have lasted for several days.

Divorce and remarriage is allowed by the Orthodox Church, divorce being seen as a necessary concession to human frailty. A second, and even a third marriage is permitted; but under no circumstances a fourth.

Watch a Greek Orthodox wedding in English from Holy Resurrection Church, Claremont, NH, USA

Watch a condensed version of the above

Watch part of a Greek wedding in Greece at Panagitsa Church, Heraklion, Crete on video

See exerpts from another Greek wedding

Read about a Greek Baptism

Read about the Greek Way of Death

Read more about the rituals of the Orthodox Church in Between Heaven and Earth: The Greek Church

powered by evisible WCM